Difference between pages "Encryption" and "Windows Memory Analysis"

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'''Encryption''' is a means to obfuscate data an entity wishes to protect to the point it will take a third party considerable time to access (decrypt) it. The methods of encryption vary from substitution ciphers to more modern methods such as digital ciphers which use an algorithm to obfuscate the data. Once the data is encrypted it is then referred to as cipher text.
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[[Operating System Password]]
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== History ==
  
[[Application Specific Encryption]]
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During the 1990s, it became a [[best practice]] to capture a [[Tools:Memory_Imaging|memory image]] during incident response. At the time, the only way to analyze such memory images was using [[strings]]. Although this method could reveal interesting details about the memory image, there was no way to associate what data came from what program, let alone what user.
  
[[Category:Encryption]]
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In the summer 2005 the [[Digital Forensic Research Workshop]] published a ''Memory Analysis Challenge''. They distributed two memory images and asked researchers to answer a number of questions about a security incident. The challenge produced two seminal works. The first, by [[Chris Betz]], introduced a tool called (NAME). The second, by [[George Garner]] and (AUTHOR) produced [[kntlist]].

Revision as of 15:37, 20 May 2006

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History

During the 1990s, it became a best practice to capture a memory image during incident response. At the time, the only way to analyze such memory images was using strings. Although this method could reveal interesting details about the memory image, there was no way to associate what data came from what program, let alone what user.

In the summer 2005 the Digital Forensic Research Workshop published a Memory Analysis Challenge. They distributed two memory images and asked researchers to answer a number of questions about a security incident. The challenge produced two seminal works. The first, by Chris Betz, introduced a tool called (NAME). The second, by George Garner and (AUTHOR) produced kntlist.