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Difference between pages "Real cases" and "AAC"

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(Real cases.)
 
(AAC.)
 
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Here is a list of publicly know cases or incidents where [[computer forensics]] methods were used.
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The '''Advanced Audio Coding''' ('''AAC''') file format is a lossy digital audio encoding format. Files downloaded from the [[iTunes Music Store]] are available in this format.
  
== Cases ==
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== Metadata ==
  
* [http://groups.google.com/group/alt.comp.virus/browse_frm/thread/f5d9d7c71c6fb540/e0e9a7986d4df76b?tvc=1 Tracking down the author of the Melissa virus] - Usenet discussion which revealed lots of information about the author of the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melissa_%28computer_worm%29 Melissa worm/virus].
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AAC files usually have a file ending of [[M4P|.m4p]] and contain lots of [[metadata]]. The output of the [[Unix]] [[strings]] command suggests that at least the following information is contained:
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* Name of the person who downloaded the file from the [[iTunes Music Store]]
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* Email address of that person (sometimes)
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* [[Timestamp]] of when the file was downloaded
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* Another timestamp (probably the date when the file was put into the [[iTunes Music Store]]?)
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* The usual metadata of music files (artist, album, cover art etc.)
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== External Links ==
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* [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Audio_Coding Wikipedia: AAC]

Revision as of 09:52, 30 March 2006

The Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) file format is a lossy digital audio encoding format. Files downloaded from the iTunes Music Store are available in this format.

Metadata

AAC files usually have a file ending of .m4p and contain lots of metadata. The output of the Unix strings command suggests that at least the following information is contained:

  • Name of the person who downloaded the file from the iTunes Music Store
  • Email address of that person (sometimes)
  • Timestamp of when the file was downloaded
  • Another timestamp (probably the date when the file was put into the iTunes Music Store?)
  • The usual metadata of music files (artist, album, cover art etc.)

External Links