Difference between pages "Tools:Data Recovery" and "File formats"

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A file format defines the structures of the data in a file.
  
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File formats can be:
'''Note:''' We're trying to use the same [[tool template]] for all devices. Please use this if possible.
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* either proprietary or public.
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* either closed (unpublished) or open specification.
  
= Data Recovery =
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A proprietary file format is a file format where "official" changes are restricted to one or more parties, often the intellectual property holder, e.g. the author.
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In contrast to a public (open or free) file format, where file format changes are open to the public, e.g. Request for Comments (RFC).
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This does not mean that all proposed changes to the format are necessarily adopted by the "official" standard.
  
; [[BringBack]]
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A file format is considered closed specification when no "official" information about the format is published by the intellectual property holder. In contrast to open specification where the intellectual property holder has published the format specification or at least parts of it.
: http://www.toolsthatwork.com/
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: BringBack offers easy to use, inexpensive, and highly successful data recovery for Windows and Linux (ext2) operating systems and digital images stored on memory cards, etc.
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; [[ByteBack Data Recovery Investigative Suite v4.0]]
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== External Links ==
: http://www.toolsthatwork.com
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* [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_format Wikipedia: File format]
: Now with UDMA, ATA & SATA support, memory management and greater ease and control of partition and MBR manipulations, ByteBack continues to uphold it's viability as the computer forensics and recovery application of professionals.
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* [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proprietary_format Wikipedia: Proprietary format]
  
; [[RAID Reconstructor]]
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[[Category:File format]]
: http://www.runtime.org/raid.htm
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: Runtime Software's RAID Reconstructor will reconstruct [[RAID Level 0]] (Striping) and [[RAID Level 5]] drives.
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; [[Salvation Data]]
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: http://www.salvationdata.com
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: Claims to have a program that can read the "[[bad blocks]]" of [[Maxtor]] drives with proprietary commands.
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= Partition Recovery =
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; [[Partition Table Doctor]]
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: http://www.ptdd.com/index.htm
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; [[parted]]
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: The Linux partition management tool.
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; [[Active Partition Recovery]]
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: ...
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; [[gpart]]
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: http://www.stud.uni-hannover.de/user/76201/gpart/
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; [[Testdisk]]
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: http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk
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== See Also ==
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* [http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=166997 Using Norton Disk Edit to Backup Your Master Boot Record]
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== Notes ==
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* "fdisk /mbr" restores the boot code in the [[MBR]], but not the partition itself.
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Revision as of 14:42, 17 September 2012

A file format defines the structures of the data in a file.

File formats can be:

  • either proprietary or public.
  • either closed (unpublished) or open specification.

A proprietary file format is a file format where "official" changes are restricted to one or more parties, often the intellectual property holder, e.g. the author. In contrast to a public (open or free) file format, where file format changes are open to the public, e.g. Request for Comments (RFC). This does not mean that all proposed changes to the format are necessarily adopted by the "official" standard.

A file format is considered closed specification when no "official" information about the format is published by the intellectual property holder. In contrast to open specification where the intellectual property holder has published the format specification or at least parts of it.

External Links