Difference between pages "DEFT Linux 2" and "Prefetch"

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{{Infobox_Software |
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{{Expand}}
  name = DEFT v2 Linux |
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Windows Prefetch files, introduced in [[Windows|Windows XP]], are designed to speed up the application startup process. Prefetch files contain the name of the executable, a Unicode list of DLLs used by that executable, a count of how many times the executable has been run, and a timestamp indicating the last time the program was run. Although Prefetch is present in Windows 2003, by default it is only enabled for boot prefetching. The feature is also found in [[Windows Vista]], where it has been augmented with [[SuperFetch]], [[ReadyBoot]], and [[ReadyBoost]].
  maintainer = [[Stefano Fratepietro]] |
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  os = {{Linux}} |
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  genre = {{Live CD}} |
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  license = {{GPL}}, others |
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  website = [http://www.stevelab.net/deft] |
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}}
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'''DEFT v2''' is a Live CD built on top of Kubuntu 7.04 with the best tools for Computer Forensic and incident response.
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Up to 128 Prefetch files are stored in the <tt>%SystemRoot%\Prefetch</tt> directory [http://blogs.msdn.com/ryanmy/archive/2005/05/25/421882.aspx]. Each file in that directory should contain the name of the application (up to eight (?) characters), a dash, and then an eight character hash of the location from which that application was run, and a <tt>.pf</tt> extension. The filenames should be all uppercase except for the extension. The format of hashes is not known. A sample filename for [[md5deep]] would look like: <tt>MD5DEEP.EXE-4F89AB0C.pf</tt>. If an application is run from two different locations on the drive (i.e. the user runs <tt>C:\md5deep.exe</tt> and then <tt>C:\Apps\Hashing\md5deep.exe</tt>), there will be two different prefetch files in the Prefetch folder.
  
== Tools included ==
 
  
'''Deft v2 computer and network forensic packages list:'''
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== Signature ==
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Each Prefetch file has a signature in the first 8 bytes of the file. Windows XP will generate Prefetch files with the signature \x11\x00\x00\x00\x53\x43\x43\x41 (0x41434353 0x00000011). Windows 7 and Windows Vista Prefetch file's signature is \x17\x00\x00\x00\x53\x43\x43\x41 (0x41434353 0x00000017). The [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII ASCII] representation of these bytes will display "....SCCA".
  
: - sleuthkit, collection of UNIX-based command line tools that allow you to investigate a computer
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== Timestamps ==
: - autopsy, graphical interface to the command line digital investigation tools in The Sleuth Kit
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: - aff lib, advanced forensic format
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: - gpart, tool which tries to guess the primary partition table of a PC-type hard disk
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: - dd rescue, copy data from one file or block device to another
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: - foremost, console program to recover files based on their headers, footers, and internal data structures
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: - hex dump, combined hex and ascii dump of any file
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: - khex edit, a versatile and customizable hex editor
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: - steg detect, a steganography detection software
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: - outguess, a stegano tool
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: - ophcrack, Windows password recovery
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: - wireshark, network sniffer
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: - ettercap, network sniffer
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: - nessus, vulnerability and security scanner (client)
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: - nessusd, vulnerability and security scanner (server)
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: - nmap, the best network scanner
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: - airsnort, wireless LAN (WLAN) tool which recovers encryption keys
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: - kismet, sniffer and intrusion detection system that work with any wireless card
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: - dmraid, discover software RAID devices
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: - testdisk, tool to recover damaged partitions
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: - qtparted, a Partition Magic clone written in C++ using the Qt toolkit
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: - vinetto, tool to examine Thumbs.db files
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: - trID, tool to identify file types from their binary signatures
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: - readpst, a tools to read ms-Outlook pst files
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: - john, john the ripper password cracker
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: - clam, anti virus
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 +
Both the [[NTFS]] timestamps for a Prefetch file and the timestamp embedded in each Prefetch file contain valuable information. The timestamp embedded within the Prefetch file is a 64-bit (QWORD) [http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms724284.aspx FILETIME] object The creation date of the file indicates the first time the application was executed. Both the modification date of the file and the embedded timestamp indicate the last time the application was executed.
  
'''Deft v2 utility package list:'''
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Windows will store timestamps according to Windows [http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms724290%28VS.85%29.aspx epoch].
  
: - linux Kernel 2.6.20
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==== Creation Time ====
: - lkDE 3.5.6
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The creation time does not have a static offset on any Windows platform. The location of the creation time can be found using the offset 0x8 + length of Volume path offset. See section Volume for more information.
: - k3b
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: - krdc
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==== Last Run Time ====
: - rdesktop
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A timestamp of when the application was last ran is embedded into the Prefetch file. The offset to the "Last Run Time" is located at offset 0x78 from the beginning of the file on [[Windows]] XP. The offset for Windows Vista and Windows 7 is at 0x80.
: - vmware client
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: - samba client
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== MetaData ==
: - open SSH client & server
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==== Header ====
: - speedcrunch
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In each Prefetch file, the size of the header is stored and can be found at offset 0x54 on Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7. The header size for Windows XP is 0x98 (152) and 0xf0 (240) on Windows Vista and Windows 7.
 +
 
 +
The Prefetch file will embed the application's name into the header at offset 0x10.
 +
 
 +
==== Run Count ====
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The run count, or number of times the application has been run, is a 4-byte (DWORD) value located at offset 0x90 from the beginning of the file on [[Windows]] XP. On Windows Vista and Windows 7, the run time can be found at 0x98.
 +
 
 +
==== Volume ====
 +
Volume related information, volume path and volume serial number, are embedded into the Prefetch file. The precise offset for this information is the same for each Prefetch file and Windows operating system. In the header at offset 0x6c, the location of the volume path is stored. The location is a 4-bytes (DWORD) value.
 +
 
 +
At the location given from offset 0x6c, a 4-byte value is stored which is the number of bytes from current offset (location from offset 0x6c) to the beginning of the volume path string. The location from the offset 0x6c, for ease of reading, will be called the "volume path offset." The volume path is embedded as an [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-16/UCS-2 UTF-16] encoded string.
 +
 
 +
The length of the volume path string is a 4-byte value is located at volume path offset + 0x4.
 +
 
 +
The volume [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volume_serial_number serial number] is a 4-byte value that identifies a media storage. A serial number does not have a consistent offset within a Prefetch between Windows operating systems. The 4-byte value can be found eight (8) bytes from the creation time location. The [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vol_%28command%29 vol] command on Windows can verify the volume serial number.
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 +
==== End of File ====
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The end of file (EOF) for each Prefetch file is located at offset 0xc.
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 +
==== Files ====
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 +
Embedded within each Prefetch file are files and directories that were used doing the application's startup. The Prefetch file separates both filenames and directories into two different location in the file. Each string is encoded as a [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-16/UCS-2 UTF-16] string. Windows operating system uses UTF-16 encoding.
 +
 
 +
The offset to the first set of filenames are at 0x64. The size of the first set of filenames can be found at offset 0x68. Both offsets are consistent between Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7.
 +
 
 +
In the bottom section of the Prefetch file are UTF-16 strings of directories. At the time of this writing (7/2011), the precise offset and size of the directory listing is unknown. The distance between the end of the Volume Path string and the beginning of the directory strings is given. An approach to finding the offset to the beginning of the directories listing is to obtain the distance value and the offset when the Volume Path string ends (after the NULL bytes). The distance value is at volume path offset + 0x18 (24). The distance is a 4-byte (DWORD) value. The end of second set of strings will complete the Prefetch file. The size of the directory listing is calculated by subtracting the start position of the directory listing from the end of file position.
 +
 
 +
== See Also ==
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* [[SuperFetch]]
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* [[Prefetch XML]]
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 +
== External Links ==
 +
* [http://milo2012.wordpress.com/2009/10/19/windows-prefetch-folder-tool/ Prefetch-Tool Script] - Python looks Prefetch files up on a web server.
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* [http://www.mitec.cz/wfa.html Windows File Analyzer] - Parses Prefetch files, thumbnail databases, shortcuts, index.dat files, and the recycle bin
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* [http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/driver/kernel/XP_kernel.mspx#ECLAC Microsoft's description of Prefetch when Windows XP was introduced]
 +
* [http://msdn.microsoft.com/msdnmag/issues/01/12/XPKernel/default.aspx More detail from Microsoft]
 +
* [http://www.tzworks.net/prototype_page.php?proto_id=1 Windows Prefetch parser] Free tool that can be run on Windows, Linux or Mac OS-X.

Revision as of 09:50, 6 July 2011

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Please help to improve this article by expanding it.
Further information might be found on the discussion page.

Windows Prefetch files, introduced in Windows XP, are designed to speed up the application startup process. Prefetch files contain the name of the executable, a Unicode list of DLLs used by that executable, a count of how many times the executable has been run, and a timestamp indicating the last time the program was run. Although Prefetch is present in Windows 2003, by default it is only enabled for boot prefetching. The feature is also found in Windows Vista, where it has been augmented with SuperFetch, ReadyBoot, and ReadyBoost.

Up to 128 Prefetch files are stored in the %SystemRoot%\Prefetch directory [1]. Each file in that directory should contain the name of the application (up to eight (?) characters), a dash, and then an eight character hash of the location from which that application was run, and a .pf extension. The filenames should be all uppercase except for the extension. The format of hashes is not known. A sample filename for md5deep would look like: MD5DEEP.EXE-4F89AB0C.pf. If an application is run from two different locations on the drive (i.e. the user runs C:\md5deep.exe and then C:\Apps\Hashing\md5deep.exe), there will be two different prefetch files in the Prefetch folder.


Signature

Each Prefetch file has a signature in the first 8 bytes of the file. Windows XP will generate Prefetch files with the signature \x11\x00\x00\x00\x53\x43\x43\x41 (0x41434353 0x00000011). Windows 7 and Windows Vista Prefetch file's signature is \x17\x00\x00\x00\x53\x43\x43\x41 (0x41434353 0x00000017). The ASCII representation of these bytes will display "....SCCA".

Timestamps

Both the NTFS timestamps for a Prefetch file and the timestamp embedded in each Prefetch file contain valuable information. The timestamp embedded within the Prefetch file is a 64-bit (QWORD) FILETIME object The creation date of the file indicates the first time the application was executed. Both the modification date of the file and the embedded timestamp indicate the last time the application was executed.

Windows will store timestamps according to Windows epoch.

Creation Time

The creation time does not have a static offset on any Windows platform. The location of the creation time can be found using the offset 0x8 + length of Volume path offset. See section Volume for more information.

Last Run Time

A timestamp of when the application was last ran is embedded into the Prefetch file. The offset to the "Last Run Time" is located at offset 0x78 from the beginning of the file on Windows XP. The offset for Windows Vista and Windows 7 is at 0x80.

MetaData

Header

In each Prefetch file, the size of the header is stored and can be found at offset 0x54 on Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7. The header size for Windows XP is 0x98 (152) and 0xf0 (240) on Windows Vista and Windows 7.

The Prefetch file will embed the application's name into the header at offset 0x10.

Run Count

The run count, or number of times the application has been run, is a 4-byte (DWORD) value located at offset 0x90 from the beginning of the file on Windows XP. On Windows Vista and Windows 7, the run time can be found at 0x98.

Volume

Volume related information, volume path and volume serial number, are embedded into the Prefetch file. The precise offset for this information is the same for each Prefetch file and Windows operating system. In the header at offset 0x6c, the location of the volume path is stored. The location is a 4-bytes (DWORD) value.

At the location given from offset 0x6c, a 4-byte value is stored which is the number of bytes from current offset (location from offset 0x6c) to the beginning of the volume path string. The location from the offset 0x6c, for ease of reading, will be called the "volume path offset." The volume path is embedded as an UTF-16 encoded string.

The length of the volume path string is a 4-byte value is located at volume path offset + 0x4.

The volume serial number is a 4-byte value that identifies a media storage. A serial number does not have a consistent offset within a Prefetch between Windows operating systems. The 4-byte value can be found eight (8) bytes from the creation time location. The vol command on Windows can verify the volume serial number.

End of File

The end of file (EOF) for each Prefetch file is located at offset 0xc.

Files

Embedded within each Prefetch file are files and directories that were used doing the application's startup. The Prefetch file separates both filenames and directories into two different location in the file. Each string is encoded as a UTF-16 string. Windows operating system uses UTF-16 encoding.

The offset to the first set of filenames are at 0x64. The size of the first set of filenames can be found at offset 0x68. Both offsets are consistent between Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7.

In the bottom section of the Prefetch file are UTF-16 strings of directories. At the time of this writing (7/2011), the precise offset and size of the directory listing is unknown. The distance between the end of the Volume Path string and the beginning of the directory strings is given. An approach to finding the offset to the beginning of the directories listing is to obtain the distance value and the offset when the Volume Path string ends (after the NULL bytes). The distance value is at volume path offset + 0x18 (24). The distance is a 4-byte (DWORD) value. The end of second set of strings will complete the Prefetch file. The size of the directory listing is calculated by subtracting the start position of the directory listing from the end of file position.

See Also

External Links