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<small>JAN-2010</small>
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<small>FEB-2010</small>
[http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/35/09/62/PDF/ColDanDauDef09.pdf Using Graphics Processors for Parallelizing Hash-based Data Carving], by Sylvain Collange, Marc Daumas, Yoginder S. Dandass, and David Defour, Proceedings of the 42nd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - 2009.  
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[http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/journals/259/csi-effect.htm The 'CSI Effect': Does It Really Exist?], by The Honorable Donald E. Shelton
  
Abstract
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Crime and courtroom proceedings have long been fodder for film and television scriptwriters. In recent years, however, the media's use of the courtroom as a vehicle for drama has not only proliferated, it has changed focus. In apparent fascination with our criminal justice process, many of today's courtroom dramas are based on actual cases. Court TV offers live gavel-to-gavel coverage of trials over the Internet for $5.95 a month. Now, that's "reality television"!
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Reality and fiction have begun to blur with crime magazine television shows such as 48 Hours Mystery, American Justice, and even, on occasion, Dateline NBC. These programs portray actual cases, but only after extensively editing the content and incorporating narration for dramatic effect. Presenting one 35-year-old cold case, for example, 48 Hours Mystery filmed for months to capture all pretrial hearings as well as the 2-week trial; the program, however, was ultimately edited to a 1-hour episode that suggested the crime remained a "mystery" . . . notwithstanding the jury's guilty verdict....
  
The ability to detect fragments of deleted image files and to reconstruct these image files from all available fragments on disk is a key activity in the field of digital forensics. Although reconstruction of image files from the file fragments on disk can be accomplished by simply comparing the content of sectors on disk with the content of known files, this brute-force approach can be time consuming.
 
  
This paper presents results from research into the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) in detecting specific image file byte patterns in disk clusters. Unique identifying pattern for each disk sector is compared against patterns in known images. A pattern match indicates the potential presence of an image and flags the disk sector for further in-depth examination to confirm the match. The GPU-based implementation outperforms the software implementation by a significant margin.
 
 
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Revision as of 21:09, 15 February 2010

This is the Forensics Wiki, a Creative Commons-licensed wiki devoted to information about digital forensics (also known as computer forensics). We currently list a total of 704 pages.

Much of computer forensics is focused on the tools and techniques used by investigators, but there are also a number of important papers, people, and organizations involved. Many of those organizations sponsor conferences throughout the year and around the world. You may also wish to examine the popular journals and some special reports.


Selected Forensics Research

FEB-2010 The 'CSI Effect': Does It Really Exist?, by The Honorable Donald E. Shelton

Crime and courtroom proceedings have long been fodder for film and television scriptwriters. In recent years, however, the media's use of the courtroom as a vehicle for drama has not only proliferated, it has changed focus. In apparent fascination with our criminal justice process, many of today's courtroom dramas are based on actual cases. Court TV offers live gavel-to-gavel coverage of trials over the Internet for $5.95 a month. Now, that's "reality television"!

Reality and fiction have begun to blur with crime magazine television shows such as 48 Hours Mystery, American Justice, and even, on occasion, Dateline NBC. These programs portray actual cases, but only after extensively editing the content and incorporating narration for dramatic effect. Presenting one 35-year-old cold case, for example, 48 Hours Mystery filmed for months to capture all pretrial hearings as well as the 2-week trial; the program, however, was ultimately edited to a 1-hour episode that suggested the crime remained a "mystery" . . . notwithstanding the jury's guilty verdict....



(Past selected articles are archived here.)


Topics



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