Difference between pages "Oxygen Forensic Suite 2" and "Department of Justice, Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section"

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(Version update.)
 
 
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<th colspan="2" style="padding:0.1em; font-size:1em; background-color:#cee0f2;">Current version</th>
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  <td align="right"><b>Version Number:</b></td>
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  <td align="left">2.1</td>
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  <td align="right" ><b>Date Released:</b></td>
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  <td align="left">23 March 2009</td>
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<th colspan="2" style="padding:0.1em; font-size:1em; background-color:#cee0f2;">Recent changes</th>
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  <td colspan="2" align="left">
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    <ul>
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    <li>Added support for more than 70 Motorola phones
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    <li>Added To-Do list/Tasks extraction
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    <li>Added extraction of E-mail and MMS attachments
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    <li>Added extraction of Web browser bookmarks
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    </ul>
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<th colspan="2" style="padding:0.1em; font-size:1em; background-color:#cee0f2;">Screenshots</th>
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[[Image:OFS2_02_EventLog.png|200px|thumb|center|Event log]]
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[[Image:OFS2_04_LifeBlog.png|200px|thumb|center|Geo event positioning (LifeBlog) data]]
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[[Image:OFS2_05_FileBrowser.png|200px|thumb|center|File Browser with Hex viewer]]
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[[Image:OFS2_08_MessagesExportPDF.png|200px|thumb|center|Sample report]]
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[http://www.oxygen-forensic.com/en/screenshots/ More screenshots ... ]
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'''Oxygen Forensic Suite 2''' is a mobile forensic software for logical analysis of [[cell phones]], [[SmartPhones|smartphones]] and [[PDAs]] developed by [[Oxygen Software]]. The suite can extract device information, contacts, calendar events, [[SMS]] messages, event logs, and files. In addition, the vendor claims the suite can extract metadata related to the above. As of March 2008 the suite supported more than 1,350 devices, including [[Nokia]], Vertu, [[Sony Ericsson]], Samsung, Motorola, [[BlackBerry|Blackberry]], Panasonic, Siemens, HTC, HP, E-Ten, Gigabyte, i-Mate and other mobile phones. The suite also supports devices running [[symbian|Symbian OS]] and [[Microsoft Windows Mobile|Windows Mobile 5/6]].
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The '''Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section''' of the '''United States Department of Justice (CCIPS)''' is responsible for implementing the Department's national strategies in combating computer and intellectual property crimes worldwide. The Computer Crime Initiative is a comprehensive program designed to combat electronic penetrations, data thefts, and cyberattacks on critical information systems. CCIPS prevents, investigates, and prosecutes computer crimes by working with other government agencies, the private sector, academic institutions, and foreign counterparts. Section attorneys work to improve the domestic and international infrastructure-legal, technological, and operational-to pursue network criminals most effectively. The Section's enforcement responsibilities against intellectual property crimes are similarly multi-faceted. Intellectual Property (IP) has become one of the principal U.S. economic engines, and the nation is a target of choice for thieves of material protected by copyright, trademark, or trade-secret designation. In pursuing all these goals, CCIPS attorneys regularly run complex investigations, resolve unique legal and investigative issues raised by emerging computer and telecommunications technologies; litigate cases; provide litigation support to other prosecutors; train federal, state, and local law enforcement personnel; comment on and propose legislation; and initiate and participate in international efforts to combat computer and intellectual property crime.  
  
== Forensic Soundness ==
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The Cybercrime lab is responsible for providing computer forensic and other technical support to CCIPS attorneys as it applies to implementing the Department's national strategies in combating computer and intellectual property crimes worldwide. 
  
The suite access devices using advanced proprietary protocols. Some devices like smartphones require an Agent installation. Of course, installing software onto the device being examined will impact the forensic soundness of the investigation. If such information is not obtainable by other means and the impact is documented, it may still be admissible under the [[Best Evidence Rule]].
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The Cybercrime lab supports the CCIPS comprehensive program designed to combat electronic penetrations, data thefts, and cyber attacks on critical information systems.  The Cybercrime lab also provides technical support and training to improve the domestic and international infrastructure-legal, technological, and operational-to pursue network criminals most effectively. The Section's enforcement responsibilities against intellectual property crimes are similarly multi-faceted. Intellectual Property (IP) has become one of the principal U.S. economic engines, and the nation is a target of choice for thieves of material protected by copyright, trademark, or trade-secret designation.
 
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== Previous Names ==
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Oxygen Forensic Suite was previously marketed as "Oxygen Phone Manager II (Forensic Edition)"
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== External Links ==
 
== External Links ==
* [http://www.oxygen-forensic.com/ Official web site]
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* [http://www.cybercrime.gov/ Official web site]
  
[[Category:Windows Mobile]]
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[[Category:Organizations]]
[[Category:Mobile device tools]]
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[[Category:Law enforcement agencies]]

Latest revision as of 02:22, 4 August 2012

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The Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section of the United States Department of Justice (CCIPS) is responsible for implementing the Department's national strategies in combating computer and intellectual property crimes worldwide. The Computer Crime Initiative is a comprehensive program designed to combat electronic penetrations, data thefts, and cyberattacks on critical information systems. CCIPS prevents, investigates, and prosecutes computer crimes by working with other government agencies, the private sector, academic institutions, and foreign counterparts. Section attorneys work to improve the domestic and international infrastructure-legal, technological, and operational-to pursue network criminals most effectively. The Section's enforcement responsibilities against intellectual property crimes are similarly multi-faceted. Intellectual Property (IP) has become one of the principal U.S. economic engines, and the nation is a target of choice for thieves of material protected by copyright, trademark, or trade-secret designation. In pursuing all these goals, CCIPS attorneys regularly run complex investigations, resolve unique legal and investigative issues raised by emerging computer and telecommunications technologies; litigate cases; provide litigation support to other prosecutors; train federal, state, and local law enforcement personnel; comment on and propose legislation; and initiate and participate in international efforts to combat computer and intellectual property crime.

The Cybercrime lab is responsible for providing computer forensic and other technical support to CCIPS attorneys as it applies to implementing the Department's national strategies in combating computer and intellectual property crimes worldwide.

The Cybercrime lab supports the CCIPS comprehensive program designed to combat electronic penetrations, data thefts, and cyber attacks on critical information systems. The Cybercrime lab also provides technical support and training to improve the domestic and international infrastructure-legal, technological, and operational-to pursue network criminals most effectively. The Section's enforcement responsibilities against intellectual property crimes are similarly multi-faceted. Intellectual Property (IP) has become one of the principal U.S. economic engines, and the nation is a target of choice for thieves of material protected by copyright, trademark, or trade-secret designation.

External Links