Difference between pages "Talk:Upcoming events" and "Tools:Memory Imaging"

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(Microsoft Windows)
 
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Wiki tables are normally such a pain, but yours look good.
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The [[physical memory]] of computers can be imaged and analyzed using a variety of tools. Because the procedure for accessing physical memory varies between [[operating systems]], these tools are listed by operating system.
The problem with the "long list" below is that they are all pasted in and have a lot of html formatting.
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Really, we should have a database for the conferences. Do you know of a plug-in for mediawiki that does it? (I know that plone sdoes it ,but that would be a major overhaul.)(
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This page is getting pretty long. I like the categories you've made and think they would make an excellent way to break up the page. How about the following:
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== Microsoft Windows ==
  
# [[List of open calls for papers]]
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; [[dd]]
# [[List of digital forensics conferences]]
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: A version of [[dd]] by George Garner allows an Administrator user to image memory using the ''\device\physicalmemory'' object. Userland access to this object is denied starting in Windows 2003 Service Pack 1 and Windows Vista. This program cannot be used on Windows 2003 SP1 and above.
# [[List of ongoing and continuous training opportunities]]
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# [[List of scheduled training courses]]
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What do you think? [[User:Jessek|Jessek]] 20:36, 17 August 2007 (PDT)
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; [[hibernation]] files
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: Windows 98, 2000, XP, 2003, and Vista support a feature called hibernation that saves the machine's state to the disk when the computer is powered off. When the machine is turned on again, the state is restored and the user can return to the exact point where they left off. The machine's state, including a compressed image of physical memory, is written to the disk on the System drive, usually C:, as hiberfil.sys. This file can be parsed and decompressed to obtain the memory image.
  
I suppose I could break it up.  One of the reasons it is all on one page is that many folks want a single place to look for this sort of information.  I used to send it by email to multiple lists every month, and some folks complained it was too big, but most people said leave it alone.  The move of the list to the ForensicsWiki was to allow me to keep a long list, but have it available on demand, and have it updated in a single location, but still keep the "one list to rule them all" kind of listing.
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== Exploits ==
  
Brian already has a "Conference" listing, which lists conferences, and some of the training providers have listings on a page for training providers/software providers. This was added to be the "upcoming" list, which lists everything by date, more for things in the next month or so, but due to complaints by one person or another, I list everything I know about to keep anyone from suggesting I lean towards one provider or another.
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At [[CanSec West 05]], [[Michael Becher]], [[Maximillian Dornseif]], and [[Christian N. Klein]] discussed an [[exploit]] which uses [[DMA]] to read arbitrary memory locations of a [[firewire]]-enabled system. The [http://md.hudora.de/presentations/firewire/2005-firewire-cansecwest.pdf paper] lists more details. The exploit is run on an [http://ipodlinux.org/Main_Page iPod running Linux]. This can be used to grab screen contents.  
[[User:Frnzxguy|Frnzxguy]] 13:49, 28 August 2007 (EDT)
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In theory, this could be used with the ... to send through an exploit code that would cause the system to dump the contents of its hard drive back to the [[iPod]].
I don't know if Brian is maintaining his conference list or not. I would very much like to have a database-driven list of the conferences and training. How about doing it as a Google Calendar? We can link that over here. [[User:Simsong|Simsong]] 22:54, 31 August 2007 (PDT)
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I can look into it. I have thought about a DB driven approach before, but even with a DB back-end, we still have to think of how we present it to the typical user, and who can edit/update the database. And, with the wiki, it is easy to undo spammer hits to the list... a DB may not be quite as simple to revert, depending upon how it's set up.
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[[User:Frnzxguy|Frnzxguy]] 08:05, 04 September 2007 (EDT)
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Revision as of 09:35, 20 May 2006

The physical memory of computers can be imaged and analyzed using a variety of tools. Because the procedure for accessing physical memory varies between operating systems, these tools are listed by operating system.

Microsoft Windows

dd
A version of dd by George Garner allows an Administrator user to image memory using the \device\physicalmemory object. Userland access to this object is denied starting in Windows 2003 Service Pack 1 and Windows Vista. This program cannot be used on Windows 2003 SP1 and above.
hibernation files
Windows 98, 2000, XP, 2003, and Vista support a feature called hibernation that saves the machine's state to the disk when the computer is powered off. When the machine is turned on again, the state is restored and the user can return to the exact point where they left off. The machine's state, including a compressed image of physical memory, is written to the disk on the System drive, usually C:, as hiberfil.sys. This file can be parsed and decompressed to obtain the memory image.

Exploits

At CanSec West 05, Michael Becher, Maximillian Dornseif, and Christian N. Klein discussed an exploit which uses DMA to read arbitrary memory locations of a firewire-enabled system. The paper lists more details. The exploit is run on an iPod running Linux. This can be used to grab screen contents.

In theory, this could be used with the ... to send through an exploit code that would cause the system to dump the contents of its hard drive back to the iPod.