Difference between pages ".XRY" and "RFID"

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== RFID ==
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RFID stands for Radio Frequency IDentification. It typically applies to a technology that uses radio waves to automatically identify people or objects.  While there are various ways to identify, the most common is to store a serial number that represents a person or object identity and possibly other information, on a microchip that is attached to an antenna. Collectively the microchip and antenna represent a RFID transponder or an RFID tag. The antenna gives the chip ability to transmit identity information to a RFID reader. Then the RFID reader converts the radio waves into digital information that can then be passed to the computer for usage. RFID has been around since the 1970s. Since the radio waves from the low end of the electromagnetic spectrum, waves are safe as  radio waves from a car radio.
  
.XRY from Micro Systemation is a fornsic system for analyzing digital devices. Using .XRY, all the information stored in a cell phone can be retrieved quickly and securely. It only takes a few minutes for all the information to be read and ready for processing.
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RFID and Bar codes are different technologies and have different applications. The big difference between the two is bar codes are line-of-sight technology. A scanner requires a bar code be brought towards a scanner in order for it to be read. RFID on the other hand, doesn’t require line of sight. RFID tags can be read as long as they are within range of a RFID reader. If a label is somehow removed or damaged there is no way to scan the item.
  
Below are some examples of information that can be retrieved:
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Currently many forms and sizes such as personal items, services, and products use RFID. Currently in the United States, most public transportation such as trains, buses, and restaurants such as Mcdonald's all carry RFID receptacles that allow credit card transactions using MasterCard's PayPass. MasterCard PayPass is the payment feature that can be added to any MasterCard payment account to enable payments with a simple tap. PayPass is flexible enough that it can be built into cards or other devices such as key fobs, and can be used in markets that primarily issue smart cards or those that primarily issue magnetic stripe cards.
  
– Phonebook with names, numbers, etc.
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According to InfoSync.com, "
– SMS, EMS and MMS messages
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Motorola and MasterCard are conducting field tests of new mobile phones that include Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips embedded in them as part of a cashless payment system dubbed PayPass. The phones will be equipped with Near Field Communication (NFC) systems, which will allow them to communicate with nearby readers to, for instance, pay for small purchases or tickets for transit or events simply by passing their phone close to a reader.
– Call lists
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– Calendar, tasks, notes
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– Pictures
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– Sound files, voice records
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– Video files
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– SIM card information, including deleted SMS
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… and much more.
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Once the phone and account has been identified by the RFID tag, the user's MasterCard account will be billed automatically by the network for the appropriate amount. MasterCard also sees potential for the phones as contactless readers, which it claims opens the door for "a variety of marketing and promotional applications", on which the company did not elaborate further.
  
.XRY supports over 700 different phone models including GSM, UMTS and CDMA phones. The number of models supported by .XRY is being added all the time. In 2008, four major updates were released.
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The PayPass trials will be run by the end of the year at various locations in the United States."
 
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.XRY creates an encrypted file containing a copy of the information retrieved from the phone.
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.XRY has got full support for UNICODE
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.XRY comes complete with software that reads information and then creates reports on the data listed above, and also the hardware: the ".XRY Communications Unit". The hardware is connected to a computer using a USB cable. The standard package of phone cables contains 25 different cables. The following options are available in order to connect as many different telephone models as possible to the unit:
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'''Bluetooth'''
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Some telephones are designed to communicate via Bluetooth. This is why .XRY comes with a Bluetooth interface.
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'''IR'''
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Other telephones are designed to connect only via IR. .XRY is supplied with an IR interface.
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'''USB'''
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There is also the option of connecting the telephone to the station via a USB cable.
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Final reports with a search and export function
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.XRY creates clear layouts in list form, with descriptions of the different types of activities. .XRY creates a report containing your own logotype, address, etc. or the basic information that you yourself require. .XRY also retrieves a lot of information about the phone itself, such as IMEI/ESN, IMSI, model no., matching between the clock in the telephone and the computer, etc.
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The generated report can either be printed out, exported in whole or in part, or forwarded electronically with .XRY Reader (distributed for free). A search function simplifies the task of searching for a particular name/number or some other type of text.
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[http://www.msab.com Micro Systemation AB]
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[http://www.msab.com/files/XRY.swf XRY animation]
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Revision as of 16:00, 2 December 2006

RFID

RFID stands for Radio Frequency IDentification. It typically applies to a technology that uses radio waves to automatically identify people or objects. While there are various ways to identify, the most common is to store a serial number that represents a person or object identity and possibly other information, on a microchip that is attached to an antenna. Collectively the microchip and antenna represent a RFID transponder or an RFID tag. The antenna gives the chip ability to transmit identity information to a RFID reader. Then the RFID reader converts the radio waves into digital information that can then be passed to the computer for usage. RFID has been around since the 1970s. Since the radio waves from the low end of the electromagnetic spectrum, waves are safe as radio waves from a car radio.

RFID and Bar codes are different technologies and have different applications. The big difference between the two is bar codes are line-of-sight technology. A scanner requires a bar code be brought towards a scanner in order for it to be read. RFID on the other hand, doesn’t require line of sight. RFID tags can be read as long as they are within range of a RFID reader. If a label is somehow removed or damaged there is no way to scan the item.

Currently many forms and sizes such as personal items, services, and products use RFID. Currently in the United States, most public transportation such as trains, buses, and restaurants such as Mcdonald's all carry RFID receptacles that allow credit card transactions using MasterCard's PayPass. MasterCard PayPass is the payment feature that can be added to any MasterCard payment account to enable payments with a simple tap. PayPass is flexible enough that it can be built into cards or other devices such as key fobs, and can be used in markets that primarily issue smart cards or those that primarily issue magnetic stripe cards.

According to InfoSync.com, " Motorola and MasterCard are conducting field tests of new mobile phones that include Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips embedded in them as part of a cashless payment system dubbed PayPass. The phones will be equipped with Near Field Communication (NFC) systems, which will allow them to communicate with nearby readers to, for instance, pay for small purchases or tickets for transit or events simply by passing their phone close to a reader.

Once the phone and account has been identified by the RFID tag, the user's MasterCard account will be billed automatically by the network for the appropriate amount. MasterCard also sees potential for the phones as contactless readers, which it claims opens the door for "a variety of marketing and promotional applications", on which the company did not elaborate further.

The PayPass trials will be run by the end of the year at various locations in the United States."